Leaflets for the Sudbury Silk Festival

Leaflets for the Sudbury Silk Festival

The Sudbury Silk Festival was laid on to celebrate the rich history of silk weaving in Sudbury. It comprised a day-long programme of exhibitions, talks and walks, and was held on Saturday 7 September 2019.

DL Design and Print was asked to produce a trifold leaflet to hand out to visitors on the day. The leaflet was written by WeTutor UK in the style of ‘Talbot the Dog’ who was your guide for the day enabling you to follow a trail around Sudbury and discover more about the silk weaving industry in Sudbury that still exists to this day.

The turnaround was tight on this one – final changes were still being made on the Wednesday, however we still managed to deliver 10,000 copies on Friday morning, well in time for the festival the next day.

The inside spread of the leaflet
Some of the text in the leaflet

Sudbury Town crest includes a black dog that is a Talbot. Talbots, in the Middle Ages, were hunting dogs. I am a Labrador named after that dog. I know my way around Sudbury and I often meet people outside the Town Hall. I love going there because just across the road near St Peter’s Church is a horse trough. If you read the plaque you will see how, long ago, old friends of my family were looking for their puppies and 84 other puppies. You may have read about them in the book by Dodie Smith, “101 Dalmatians”. 

In Gaol Lane, at the back of the town hall, is the Heritage Centre where you can learn about the history of Sudbury. I look in occasionally and know you will find lots more information on Sudbury and its history there. 

Also, in Gaol Lane is the place where I live …Weavers’ Piece!. This a Dye Garden, with examples of plants that were used to dye the silk after it was woven. It is full of interesting smells. You know what a dog’s nose is like…ultra-sensitive. I always know if my friends have been there. It’s a good job we’re all well behaved. The plants in flower have delicious smells too and I understand they were all so useful in days gone by. The bakery across the road smells good too!

A bit further along the lane, just off the car park is the Dental Emporium, which was once a silk “manufactory”.

From there, I like to go and look at the statue of Thomas Gainsborough which stands in front of St Peter’s Churchon the Market Hill . Thomas Gainsborough was a famous artist who was born in Sudbury. He liked to paint pictures of the areas around Sudbury but to make money he painted portraits. In some of them, including a picture of Mr and Mrs Andrews, he included a dog. The dog was a friend of my distant relations!

Also, on Market Hill is the town’s imposing library. It was once the local Corn Exchange. It was built in 1841 and is a listed building. A corn exchange was where merchants sold the grain produced on their land.

Market Hill is the site for the twice weekly market. Held on Thursdays and Saturdays, there is a record of a market in the town in the Domesday Book 1086.

If you run down the Market Hill (look out for the cars), and on to Gainsborough Street, you will find the house Thomas Gainsborough grew up in. Next door at No. 47 is the oldest silk “manufactory”. The gardens at Gainsborough’s House are particularly lovely! 

Also on Talbot’s Walks around town  are the current silk mills which are still producing silk. Vanner’s and Stephen Walters also have shops. 

I hope you enjoyed walking round my silk producing town and learning about the history. Come back soon and I am sure I’ll remember you and help you to enjoy your visit!

If you see the red posts in the garden there is also a separate Talbot Trail around Sudbury. You can buy a leaflet explaining this at the Tourist Information Centre and for more information and details of events happening in Sudbury I like www.seeanddosudbury.co.uk

The text from the leaflet